How to.. Wall Squat

Since I am not currently teaching a bootcamp class, I miss some of the exercises I would regularly do with my class. The other day I thought why can’t I throw them into cycle classes? My Tuesday night class is a Pedal Pump format where we cycle for 3 songs, hop off the bike to strength train for one song. We repeat this format for 3 rounds. For the new year I decided to add one new exercise every month that my students can practice each week. By the end of the year, they will have 12 new exercises added to their regime and have improved their ability with each one. This month (yes, we started Jan 2 weeks early) we are working on wall squats!

Wall Squats (also known as wall sits) are one of my favorite workouts. They were commonly added to my bootcamp routine and an exercise I regularly do on my own. Wall squats are all about having proper form before building your time up. I am starting the class at 30 seconds and hoping to build to over a minute by the first of February. Wondering what a wall squat is? Pretty much what the name says, your squat is being held against a wall forming a 90 degree angle on your knees. The exercise strengthens the quadricep muscles (thigh muscles baby) which of course is needed in almost every workout. I have had many students ask what is the proper form so they can practice at home. So here is how to do a proper wall squat/sit:

How to do a proper wall squat / wall sit

First, using a wall as your guide, drop in a squat position with your back against the wall, feet on the ground. Hold your squat as long as you can (trust me, those quads start burning) focusing on keeping your proper form the entire time. There are three mental notes to remember to help perfect your form:

  1. 90 Degree Angles– Your knees and hips should form 90 degree angles against the wall. Therefore, you should have a flat back against the wall and 90 degrees in your
  2. Shoulder Width Apart Feet– Your feet should be shoulder width apart and the distant from the wall will be dictated by how you can achieve 90 degrees on your legs.
  3. Flat Feet– Speaking of feet, from toes to heels, yours should remain flat on the floor, with your focus in your heels. I often see students lifting up on their toes to help distribute weight. Don’t do it! It is way too much pressure on your toes – No ballerinas here!

If you’re a visual learner or have never seen a wall squat before, check this video out on how you should look visually.

Tell me: Do you have a favorite exercise you always add to your workouts?

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